The Impatient Manager
Walter Vieira

The rules of the corporate world are now dynamic like never before. For managers, the marathon race, starting at the bottom of the pyramid and working their way upto the top in 20–30 years, is no longer a fundamental truth. With executives reaching the corner office in less than 10 years, the workplace and its aspirations have reached a new high. Impatience is now seen as a virtue and this book addresses The Impatient Manager. The book provides strategies for a faster route to corporate success and at the same time provides caution signs that will prevent career crashes in the fast lane. Using his classic engaging, anecdotal technique, the legendary Walter Vieira takes readers through their own success marathon, sprinter style.

Value Creation
Gautam Mahajan

Increasing disruption, diminishing returns, and demanding Customers require business leaders to create more Value, remain relevant, and stay ahead of competition. CEOs have to evolve a “Value Creation” culture for the company so as to properly balance the interests of Customers, Employees, Investors, and the Marketplace.

This pathbreaking book shifts the focus to Creating Value for the entire business ecosystem and not just for the shareholders. It will launch organizations into the world of Value Creation and will convert good CEOs and companies to great ones with longevity and higher profi­tability.

The Tip of the Iceberg : The Unknown Truth Behind India's Start-Ups
Suveen Sinha

A wave of entrepreneurship has been sweeping across India. The success of start-ups like Flipkart, Snapdeal, Paytm, Ola and others has veered the discourse towards high valuations. But what we mostly see is only the tip of the iceberg. Behind every high valuation today is a story of blood, sweat, toil and tears. For every entrepreneur who has an amazing success story to tell, there are countless others who have fallen by the wayside. The going has often been a far cry from the presumed romance of breaking the mold, disrupting order and changing the world. It is this desire to change the world that drives successful entrepreneurs, for they alone have the blind passion that is often the difference between success and failure, and they are the ones who love the journey more than the destination. Today, when questions are asked about whether the start-up party is nearing its end, and whether we will soon see a rerun of the dotcom bust of the early noughties, it is time to remember India’s start-up warriors. This is the story of their remarkable journeys. Some found their destination. Some did not.

Suveen Sinha is the national business editor at Hindustan Times. He writes on a range of issues relating to business, economy, sports and movies. He has been a journalist for twenty-one years, with stints at Business Standard, Business Today and Outlook. In his spare time, he tries to write books, the first of which, Driven—the memoir of former Maruti Suzuki chief Jagdish Khattar, which he co-authored—was published in 2013.

Queue Jumping
V.Raghunathan

The book is a tongue-in-cheek focus on our propensity to jump queues, irrespective of our educational, economic or social background, which frequently shows utter disregard for fairness and civility towards others. But in the process, the book does introduce available international literature on queue jumping to the readers to help them become ‘better’ queue-jumpers!

A wise man once said that half of life is showing up -- and the other half is waiting in line. In a nation of a billion people, there's no escaping queues. We find ourselves in one every day -- whether to board a flight, for a darshan at Tirupati or, if we are less fortunate, to fetch water from municipal taps. We no longer wait for years for a Fiat car or a rotary-dial phone, but there are still queues that may last days, like those for school admissions. And then there are the virtual ones at call centres in which there's no knowing when we will make contact with a human. So if you can't escape 'em, can you beat 'em? Mercifully, yes. (After all, our national hero once pronounced, 'Hum jahan khade ho jaate hain, line wahin se shuru hoti hai,' and we made it our motto.) And if so, how can you jump queues better? Which excuse works like a charm? How should you backtrack if someone objects? Does it help to make eye contact? Are we generally accommodating of queue-jumpers and why? More importantly, what does queue-jumping say about us as a people? Does it mean we lack a sense of fairness and basic concern for others? These are questions of everyday survival that bestselling author V. Raghunathan first threw up in Games Indians Play and now takes up at length in The Good Indian's Guide to Queue-jumping.